22 de julio de 2010

Efficiency and interest


The most important point is that our devotion to technology blinds us to the issue of what education is for. In America, we improve the education of our youth by improving what are called “learning technologies.” At the moment, it is considered necessary to introduce computers to the classroom, as it once was thought necessary to bring closed-circuit television and film to the classroom. To the question, “Why should we do this?” the answer is: “To make learning more efficient and more interesting.” Such an answer is considered entirely adequate, since, to the technological fundamentalists, efficiency and interest need no justification. It is, therefore, usually not noticed that this answer does not address the question, “What is learning for?”

“Efficiency and interest” is a technical answer—an answer about means, not ends—and it offers no pathway to a consideration of educational philosophy. Indeed, it blocks the way to such a consideration by beginning with the question of how we should proceed rather than with the question of why. It is probably not necessary to say that, by definition, there can be no education philosophy that does not address what learning is for. Confucius, Plato, Quintilian, Cicero, Comenius, Erasmus, Locke, Rousseau, Jefferson, Russell, Montessori, Whitehead, Dewey—each believed that there was some transcendent political, spiritual, or social idea that must be advanced through education. Confucius advocated teaching “the Way” because in tradition he saw the best hope for social order. As our first systematic fascist, Plato wished education to produce philosopher kings. Cicero argued that education must free the student from the tyranny of the present. Jefferson thought the purpose of education is to teach the young how to protect their liberties. Rousseau wished education to free the young from the unnatural constraints of a wicked and arbitrary social order. And among John Dewey's aims was to help the student function without certainty in a world of constant change and puzzling ambiguities.
What does technology have to do with finding a profound reason for educating the young?
Nothing.
Neil Postman: Deus Machina
TECHNOS QUARTERLY Winter, 1992

Vía LPC.
D.

1 comentarios:

VSB dijo...

Este pavo y lo que dice, desde los puestos que ocupa, sobre periodismo, TV y TICs es de lo más interesante...

¿Es posible ser tecnoadictxs inteligentes? ¿La politoxocomanía bien llevada? Entrar y salir de la Red, como Burroughs de la aguja. Meterse y sacarse de todo, en las redes virtuales y de carne y hueso...

Antes de pillar y usar cualquier herramienta tecnlógica una pregunta, que todo yonki lúcido nunca olvida: ¿Por cuánto? Me temo que las víctimas de Facebook ni saben eso... el pastizal al que se venden y comercian sus datos.

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